Category Archives: Typography

HAND DRAWN LETTERS

Screen Shot 2015-12-07 at 10.27.43 AMFrom HOW:
Letter-Perfect: The Gift of Hand-Drawn Letters
By Sarah Whitman

”Since she was a child, Toronto-based Lesli Ink owner Lesli Ferguson has saved every heartfelt card she’s ever received, amassing boxes upon boxes. So for the holidays last year, Ferguson wanted to send her clients a card that they, too, would cherish. ‘The holidays are notorious for generic cards, and I wanted to change that,’ Ferguson says. ‘Many of our clients are small business owners just like myself. Over time we have created these amazing connections because we face a lot of the same challenges. I really wanted to show them how much I cared about them.’”

To read this article in its entirety:
http://www.howdesign.com/articles/the-gift-of-hand-drawn-letters/

FAREWELL: Hermann Zapf (96)

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For a very well written Obituary with videos please visit – http://qz.com/421855/hermann-zapf

Hermann Zapf
November 8th, 1918 – June 4th, 2015

He was the designer of fonts such as Palatino, Optima, Zapfino, Melior, Aldus, and the bizarre but much beloved Zapf Dingbats, has died at age 96.

The revered German typographer and calligrapher passed away on June 4. In his long and prolific career, Zapf worked on many fonts, but his personal favorite was the humanist sans serif typeface Optima, the lettering chosen for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall in Washington, DC.

Zapf is survived by his wife, Gudrun Zapf von Hesse who is also an accomplished type designer and calligrapher.

ARTICLE: The Analog Origins of Google’s Material Design

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To view this article and its examples in its entirety, please visit – http://gizmodo.com/

As part of I/O, Google is giving us a closer look at the fairly old-school tools and ideas behind Material Design—and for anyone with an appreciation for a good X-Acto knife, a color wheel, or a crisp fold of paper, this is going to be deeply satisfying.

Google also posted an update on Roboto, its system typeface, and how it’s evolved over the past year. “We also wanted to add the typographic niceties we’re used to seeing in print,” says Christian Robertson. That meant refining not only the characters, but providing more weights, widths, and newly refined italics—drawing from traditional typography to add depth to a digital typeface. It’s “a living typeface,” he says, “a step beyond what we see with a lot of linotype systems.”

ARTICLE: Open Source Fonts

To view this article in its entirety, please visit – http://creativepro.com/article/open-source-fonts

In the recent past I’ve written about Free Fonts – the pros and cons, the ins and outs, etc. Another piece of that “typographic” puzzle is an additional category of free font, commonly referred to as open source fonts. The term “open source” stems from a reference to software, but since fonts are considered software, the term aptly applies to them as well. Open source fonts refers to those fonts that are made available for free, usually for both private and commercial use. The open source fonts we are now discussing are, in most cases, more professional in quality than the novice, or “hobbyist” efforts discussed in the previous column.

Open source fonts are more than just free fonts – they are part of a movement, or a philosophy if you will, that strives towards making quality fonts freely available for both personal and professional use. Some are totally freeware, while others are shareware, which means they are free to download and use, but with a small fee or donation requested (some on the honor system) if you like and use the font. The best open source fonts are found on a handful of websites where the font collection is managed, as opposed to those sites that allow anyone to upload their fonts with little or no review, or filtering process. Most open source fonts are designed and intended for use on the web (Web fonts), but some are appropriate for print use as well.

Here is a list of some of the best, and most reliable sites for open source fonts:…